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Kenn Pitawanakwat

Kenn Pitawanakwat

Photo: Marlene Finn-Wolfman

No parent should have to bury their child. Kenn Pitawanakwat lost his first born child to a snowmobile tragedy that left Kenn clawing for answers and meaning. Unable to find relevant indigenous cultural material, Kenn went on to publish his story in a memoir “When My Son Died.”  Kenn’s memoir is an open discourse into health and well-being. His child’s story is designed to elicit health, wellness, and to be shared with others. “My work is [not] done here” as his child said.  Kenn Pitawanakwat’s “When My Son Died” is a practicum Kenn applies to facilitate a safe, caring, and non-judgemental loving forum for grief expression.  Kenn Pitawanakwat guides and shares his story of recovery through Indigenous Grief Workshops, Healing Circles, and Individual Counselling. www.kennpitawanakwat.com          

City:
Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve
Province:
Ontario

Publications

When My Son Died. www.kceditions.ca, 2018
Eligible for National Public Readings Program:
Yes

WITS

Presentation Length:
as needed
Genre:
fiction,non-fiction, memoir, Indigenous, Ottawa Language/culture
Grades:
1-12 baccalaureate, post baccalaureate - PH.d.
Audience Size:
any size

Equity Initiative

As part of the Union’s Equity Implementation Plan, we are committed to increasing awareness of authors who are Black, Indigenous, racialized, LGBTQI2S, or living with a disability. This author identifies as:

  • Black, Indigenous, and/or racialized